Nightcrawlers: Just Blowing Smoke?

Researchers at Ohio State University blew smoke into nightcrawler burrows to study the extent to which these worm holes help move liquid manure around underground. Farmers inject the manure into the ground as a way of disposing of it; their rich soil and no-till soil conservation techniques make the earth a perfect earthworm habitat. Great news, except that the burrows are helping the manure drain so well that it tends to collect in these...

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Cafe Spineless

I’m a few days late getting this up, but Circus of the Spineless was hosted by Snail’s Tales this month. Go here for a dazzling assortment of inveterate invertebrates, all served up for your enjoyment. You got your snails, your worms, your caterpillars, and so much more. This image comes from one of my favorite menu selections, pomegranate stuffed with paper wasp. ...

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Worms and grubs

A post at …but it’s dirty reminds me that people often ask me about a grub or worm they found, and it’s worth pointing out, in case you’ve ever wondered, that when we talk about worms, we’re usually talking about terrestrial worms, those creatures that belong to the taxonomic class Oligochaeta. Cabbageworms, cutworms, parsley worms, and tomato worms are not worms at all but moth or butterfly caterpillars....

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Why Waste Your Waste?

For those of you in the UK…a new book on worm composting. Check it out here. From the creator of the Waste Buster Wormery. (that’s what they call worm bins in the UK. Wormeries. Charming,...

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Wiggly Wigglers is podcasting

There’s not much going on, podcast-wise, in the world of worms, but UK supplier of composting gear and much more, Wiggly Worms, has just launched a podcast. You can check it out here: Wiggly Wigglers

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My Grandfather’s Earthworm Farm

Here’s a great story about an earthworm farm–oh, and they happened to raise, chickens, cows, goats, pigs, corn, fruit, and more. My Grandfather’s Earthworm Farm How’s this for a springtime farm ritual? “When spring arrived, the season of the annual ploughing, the top layer of the heap would be stripped back, revealing the perfect work of the worms. What had originally been an ill-smelling mixture of manure, urine,...

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Agrilink

Always something new about worms from the Phillipines: Organic movement gains ground – INQ7.net “Over at the Earthworm Sanctuary booth, proprietor Antonio de Castro talked about the “Angels of the Earth,” the earthworms considered among the lowest of God’s creatures. And yet, they are a farmer’s biggest helpers. Found almost anywhere, they are easy to care for and their castings make one of the best–if...

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Worms Go To Fourth Grade

The Rodale Institute (publishers of Organic Gardening magazine) did a little worm project with some fourth graders–if you’re looking for ideas for classroom worm projects (and who isn’t, really?) check it out. Green Thumbs Around the World,...

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Worm Observations

A few words Living Deliberately, who is out there blogging about worms tonight: “These two earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) jumped into my basement when I opened the door to the yard this morning…The worm is a muscle surrounding a digestive tract, mostly protein to the hungry robin. I released these individuals back into the yard. They both tried to twist away from my fingers when I reached for them on the steps. They did not...

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Pickled Snails

Brilliant, brilliant. I’ve been following along with Circus of the Spineless, a traveling blog circus all about slimy spineless creatures of all kinds, and I’ve learned that you can in fact preserve snails in alcohol. It even preserves their DNA. Somehow I thought the snail would simply melt in alcohol, the way it would if you poured salt on it. But no. They are pickled, put in jars, and stored in museums so generations to come can...

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